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Any Vegetarians Out There?

pettyhead

Wed Jan 9, 2008 02:42AM

I'm doing quite a bit of research into getting my body back into a healthy condition. I'm looking into detoxing my body , changing eating habits , getting rid of unhealthy habits , getting back into yoga and meditation , all that good hippy kind of thing. The problem??? I am a carnivore. I've considered going vegetarian over the years but give up the idea when I get overwhelmed with the thought that I don't know how to cook vegetarian food. And, how to put together a safe weekly menu. There are so many websites out there that it's overwhelming trying to sift through them. Does anyone have any tips , websites , recipes or anything else to offer?

_michael_craft_

Wed Jan 9, 2008 09:57AM

> I'm looking into detoxing my body

It sounds like you’ve been reading holistic health articles. I know you're not going to want to hear this, but most of that stuff is pseudoscience BS. As an example, there is no evidence "detoxing" does your body any good. In fact, there is little or no evidence "holistic" or "naturopathic" treatments do anything more than separate your money from your wallet. Your best bet is to throw away any article that talks about "holistic health" and take a scientific, no-BS approach to losing weight.

I've been able to keep my weight in check and stay relatively healthy for the last 15 years. I've also done quite a bit of reading on nutrition and exercise. So based on my personal experience and research, here's what I’ve concluded:

1. When it comes to weight loss and feeling better, both diet and exercise are important. BUT... if you had to declare one being more important than the other, then it must be stated that diet is more important than exercise.

2. For most people, the most important thing is to lose weight. Therefore the rest of this will be focused on weight control.

3. The only way to lose weight - and keep it off - is to PERMANENTLY change your diet. Permanent means permanent... you must be on the diet until the day you die. A diet is not a temporary thing - it is a permanent lifestyle change. I have been on a diet for 15 years, and I plan on staying on it until I die.

4. Most people I meet someone who complain about being overweight do not blame themselves for being fat. Instead they claim, "Diets don't work for me," or "I have a disease that prevents me from losing weight." These people are in denial and have no chance of losing weight. Hence the first step to losing weight is to admit it's 100% your own fault. If you are unable to do this, you have absolutely no chance of losing weight.

5. Losing weight is conceptually simple... eat less and eat better. Sounds easy, but most people can't do it... they get weak, pig out, and quit. It takes a lot of discipline. More than most people can muster.

6. Vegetarianism is not a panacea. In fact, some experts believe it can damage your body over the long term; you run the risk of becoming anemic and may suffer from a protein-deficiency. Another problem is that a lot of people read articles by vegetarians that are full of pseudoscience nonsense. These authors want to convenience you that humans are supposed to be herbivores, which is complete and utter nonsense.

7. Do not eat fired foods. Ever. There is no reason to eat fried foods. (I haven't eaten fried foods in 15 years.) Pretend fried food is poison. If you have a deep fryer, throw it away. There is no reason to have it.

8. Eat ultra-lean meat and poultry. Eat more fish (but not fried!). Eat more protein and less carbs. Eat more fresh vegetables and raw fruit. Eat very very very little fat. Drink more water. Never eat until you're full. Never eat if you're not hungry. Eat more fiber. Though less important than other things, you should also try to minimize your intake of simple grains (pasta, rice, bread, etc.).

9. Do not eat food from a fast-food restaurant. I can't remember the last time I ate food from a fast-food restaurant.

10. There is absolutely no reason to eat - or cook with - lard, grease, butter, or cooking oil. Each of those is 100% fat. Avoid them like the plague.

11. Try to minimize the number of simple sugars & carbs you consume. It should be mentioned, however, that this is not nearly as important as minimizing the amount of fat you consume.

12. Want to know how difficult it is to lose weight? Here is a list of things I never (or very very very rarely) eat: ice cream, cake, pizza, anything fired, anything high in fat, whole milk, 2% milk, hamburgers, chocolate, mayonnaise, butter, sour cream, salad dressing (unless fat-free), hot dogs, French fries, hamburger meat, potato chips, cheese, baloney, muffins, candy bars, sausage, bacon, pastries, salami, pancakes, burritos, donuts, French toast, omelets, bean dip, and anything from a fast-food restaurant.

13. If you do not have the discipline to eat less and avoid the wrong kinds of foods, then losing weight is not in your future. Most people don't have the discipline, which is why over 90% of people fail at losing weight.

eleehenderson

Wed Jan 9, 2008 10:08AM

There is a great book I discovered several years ago by Peter D'Adamo called something like 4 diets, 4 blood types, eat right for your type. There are suggestions concerning foods in reference to your blood type that are in your best interest to eat, that are neutral, and that are not in your best interest. They tell you what speeds your metabolism, and slows it down.

There is nothing I've found that is less expensive, and more extensive on the subject of finding your perfect weight and diet. There is not a perfect diet for all of us. Our chemistry is different based on our blood types according to the author. It sure has worked for me.

Perhaps you are type O, and need lean red meat to get your vitamin k. I suggest doing research before you jump into something very different than things that have served you well to this point.

Having fun,

Lee

_michael_craft_

Wed Jan 9, 2008 10:58AM

> There are suggestions concerning foods in reference to your blood type that are in your best interest to eat, that are neutral, and that are not in your best interest.

Losing weight is primary accomplished by eating less and eating better, regardless of anything esle. *If* your blood type is a factor in losing weight - and that’s a big if - it’s a third or fourth-order effect, not a first-order effect. I would pay no attention to it.


> There is not a perfect diet for all of us.

The laws of physics apply equally to all of us. What I’m getting at is this: the same basic rules for losing weight apply to each and every person who wants to lose weight. Any person - regardless of blood type, body type, genetics, ethnicity, gender - can lose weight by eating less and eating better. It’s simple physics.

The more I think about it, the more I believe one of the reasons people can't lose weight is because they're reading too much trendy/pseudoscience BS and ignoring the real, proven, scientific approaches to losing weight.

pettyhead

Wed Jan 9, 2008 03:51PM

I was reading a bit about the blood type diet. Hadn't hard of it until something about diets came on tv , last week. They also had a tapeworm diet! Hmmm
I've decided that the best thing to do is to focus on a healthier attitude towards food and change the way I prepare foods. We eat alot of red meat and potatoes. I cook the way I was taught.
Also , diets fail over and over again because I've focused on it being all or nothing. And, I feel I'm depriving myself. Changing a lifestyle isn't easy but if I can ease into it I think it will have more long term effects. If I start counting calories I'll quit in a week.
For me it seems like giving up red meat and fried food is like giving up a drug. but,these things are also making my body feel ICK. I read somewhere that the red meat we eat sits in our system for DAYS before it rots and passes. (My be that Dr. Oz guy on Oprah) Another concern is quantity. As Mike can attest , I put out a huge spread whenever company is here. I cook the same way for the family. Portion control and learning to know when I am full and that full doesn't mean bursting at the seams.
But,how can veggies and fish taste yummy? They seem so bland to me.

_michael_craft_

Wed Jan 9, 2008 07:41PM

> I was reading a bit about the blood type diet. Hadn't hard of it until something about diets came on tv , last week.

Yea, you don't need to know your blood type to lose weight. ;)

> I've decided that the best thing to do is to focus on a healthier attitude towards food and change the way I prepare foods. We eat alot of red meat and potatoes. I cook the way I was taught.

The way you prepare foods can indeed be important. As an example, broiled is always better than fried. But even more important is *what* you eat.

> Also , diets fail over and over again because I've focused on it being all or nothing. And, I feel I'm depriving myself. Changing a lifestyle isn't easy but if I can ease into it I think it will have more long term effects. If I start counting calories I'll quit in a week.

Don’t think of it as, "I'm going on a diet." Instead say to yourself, "I am changing my lifestyle." Because that's what it is - a complete lifestyle change.

> For me it seems like giving up red meat and fried food is like giving up a drug.

Yep, it is very much like giving up a drug. We love the taste and texture of fat so much that we literally crave it. Another thing to keep in mind is that you will *always* crave it. I have not eaten a french fry in probably 10 years. Yet I *love* them. I have not eaten bacon in 10 years. But I *love* bacon. I love and crave all the fatty & rich foods. But they're not part of my everyday diet.

When I tell people I eat fried foods only 2 or 3 times a year (and only at parties when there's nothing else to eat), they look at me like I'm a freak.

> As Mike can attest , I put out a huge spread whenever company is here. I cook the same way for the family. Portion control and learning to know when I am full and that full doesn't mean bursting at the seams.

When we have training at our house, I always have a few dozen donuts and bagels on the table for folks to eat. As any of our members can attest, I have *never* eaten a donut from the tray. And I rarely eat a bagel.

> But, how can veggies and fish taste yummy? They seem so bland to me.

First of all it's a learned thing... you have convinced yourself that they don't taste good, when in reality they *do* taste good. Secondly, you can always doctor them up with spices and what not. (Just don't use sauce with fat in it.)

FYI, I have tried to help a couple of people change their lifestyle when it comes to food. I have *never* been successful. The taste of fat is a very powerful drug! As an example, a few years ago a friend of mine who is overweight (you know him) was lamenting the fact that he's fat and asked for my advice. I gave him all of the advice I posted in this thread and told him to take one step at a time. "For starters," I said, "Just do ONE thing: eliminate all fried food from your diet." All of the sudden he realized that losing weight would mean giving up things he loves. So he mumbled something along the lines, "Um, yea, that sounds like a good idea." I then said, "If you're *serious* about this, you'll cut the plug off your deep fryer and throw it in the trash." He responded, "Um, hmm, good idea."

A week later I went to his house. The deep fryer was still in the kitchen. I said, "Why haven't you thrown out your deep fryer? He said, "Um, my wife doesn't, um, want me to." I said, "No problem. Just don't eat any fried food she cooks. So did you eat fried food this week?" He blushed and said, "Yes." I knew then it was a hopeless cause and decided not to help him anymore. Today he is still fat and complains about it. Oh well.

Do you see what I’m getting at? As soon as some kind of sacrifice is involved they bail out. And this is why 90% of people fail at losing weight... they have the *knowledge* to do it, but they don’t have *discipline* to make it happen.

Do you have a deep fryer, Aileen? If so, are you willing to throw it out? It's a good test for yourself to see if you're serious. I know you don't want to hear this, but if you're not willing to throw it out, then you should learn to be happy with your current lifestyle and not torture yourself trying to lose weight.

eleehenderson

Thu Jan 10, 2008 08:29AM

Michael & Aileen,

I always try to take advice from people I believe are less screwed up than me :o)

I try to feed myself what nourishes my mind, body and spirit. (That includes both food and information,)

I practice a form of exercise that strengthens my body, and results in more flexibility for me.

With a bit of luck added in, I've become a physically fit, flexible and productive 62 year old, "airy fairy" senior :o)

Having fun,

Lee

PS: The next beginner yoga class starts the 15th.

_michael_craft_

Thu Jan 10, 2008 09:56AM

Lee:

I realize I am coming off as cold and rigid. But I'm an engineer, I am very analytical (which is both a blessing and a curse), and consequently I don't buy any of the "feel-good, holistic, spiritual" stuff. (Sorry!) I think it's a scam for the most part. But having said that, I do think a lot of value can come from yoga. Even some professional athletes have found it worthwhile. But... if a person is out of shape and overweight, it is my opinion yoga will provide little if any benefit. There is really only one proven solution for a person who is out-of-shape/overweight: *eat* *less* *and* *eat* *better*. But this is a lot easier said than done. It's like trying to kick a crack habit.

whepp

Thu Jan 10, 2008 11:38AM

Lee, could you please email me the details of your class. I have a group of ladies (and myself) that are interested. Thanks!

whepp@woh.rr.com

pettyhead

Thu Jan 10, 2008 01:33PM

In defense of Yoga , it's a good tool in loosing weight. For me I am always full of stress. When I'm stressed I eat. Also , when you are feeling stressed your body tends to hold onto belly fat.
As for the fryer , I actually have 2. I've used the one twice and the other I use maybe once a month and just for snack stuff. Am I willing to throw them away (both gifts from Mom)? Do you really think my kids would allow that? They aren't going to give up their deep fried veggies for anything! They also are in great shape so it's not going to be an issue denying them.
On the other hand , Tom has agreed that we both need to start eating healthier. So , we're easing into a new way of eating. I think we've decided that fish and chicken are fine. (and NO they don't have a soul , Stephan !! lmao) Tofu is going to have to be a hidden item if I'm going to get anyone to eat it.
I found a bunch of vegetarian items marked down at Kroger's and I tried my first veggie burger. It looks like a hamburger and tastes like....well , like a veggie burger....but if you put some veggie cheese flavored like swiss it's not the worst thing in the world. It's no Whopper but it'll do.
We ate a chicken veggie pasta dish last night and I served it on our small plates. Guess what? I got enought to eat and didn't feel like the Goodyear blimp when I pushed myself away from the table.

_michael_craft_

Thu Jan 10, 2008 04:15PM

Aileen:

Congrats on changing your diet! That's the first step.

The main thing is to stay away from foods high in fat. Look at the ingredients list of EVERYTHING you buy. If it's high in fat, put it back. (If it's fried there is no reason to check the ingredients list since ALL fried foods are high in fat.)

And here's a secret: eat more soup. Not only are most soups fairly low in fat, but most have a high water content and thus make you feel full without the aid of calories.

As far as the deep dryer goes, one of the things I've found is that it's actually easier to completely give something up than "eat a little bit of it." But do whatever works for you.

I also hope I'm not sounding "holier than thou" in my comments here. Even though my diet is pretty extreme (very low fat, high protein, no fried foods, no fast food, etc.), I still fall off the wagon on occasion. My weakness is sugary sweets. I love sugar!! I also love beer. Both will pack on the pounds. Over the last 8 months I have gained about 12 pounds, so a few weeks ago I disavowed sweets and snacks. I haven't given up on beer, though! LOL.

eleehenderson

Thu Jan 10, 2008 10:36PM

Michael,

I am not an engineer.
I too am analytical.

A person who is out of shape, and over weight is probably not thinking much about self nourishment or respect. The yoga classes I teach, and all those I have attended over the years focus on the relationship between self nourishing and self respect.

My occupation requires that I be at the top of my game 24/7. In order to serve people as long as I have @ the level I require of myself, I need a constant reminder of that relationship between self nourishing and self respect.

With the very long hours I spend serving, it would be easy to fall into the cruddy food trap. When I find myself at the end of a long day, and hungry, I treat myself to a trip to Chipotle which is 20 minutes from my Urbana office. They serve only organic nourishing food @ what I feel are very reasonable prices. If I have the funds, I'd bring a Chipotle to Urbana as a community service.

When you get into the self respecting mode, weight becomes much less important than accepting yourself as being on purpose, and taking good care of yourself. Every single part of every single person is a miracle. Feeding it what is not in your best interest at that point just makes no sense. Unless, of course, it's a buckeye from Braden's sweet shop :o) I know that sugar is not in my best interest. I also know that if I make wise choices most of the time, the world will continue to turn if I treat myself to a buckeye now and then :o)

Wendy, I'll send your email now. I left you a phone message, but know you're a pretty busy mom these days.

Having fun,

Lee

huffmak2

Thu Jan 10, 2008 11:40PM

Aileen,
Lee has some good points.. I think that making the choice to eat healthy is a big part of the battle.. I changed a lot of my diet, not because of weight, but because heart problems run in my family.. My grandmother had 3 heart attacks, my dad suffered one at 58 and had a quadruple bypass, My oldest son was born with a heart problem so I knew I was at risk.. I had my cholesterol tested and came up at 263 and I'm only 36.. I started buying healthier food, lots of fruits and veggies, and started cutting down on the fried foods... I still cook a lot of the same foods, just differently.. maybe every other month we'll have a big fried chicken dinner for the heck of it.. but if you feel like you're depriving yourself, you're going to have a harder time sticking to anything... I lost my taste for sugar and sweet foods so I had it easy there, not so for the rest of the family..but I found that you can replace that sweet flavor with fruit, and juice, which is pretty healthy. I eat a lot of yogurt, with fruit, and cut out frying pretty much everything.. Still eat red meat, nothing like a juicy steak, mm, mm.. but now instead of frying, I broil or grill... And I've heard of the blood type diet as well.. and I think it's also true... Pasta and Bread are two things i love but are supposed to bad for my blood type.. I gave up pasta and cut down on bread.. and I've not had stomach aches at all in the past 4 months... And if you start small, it always helps.. Start with the easier things first whether it's cutting them out and replacing with something else, or just finding a different way to prepare.. My friend also just lost about 60 pounds.. All she did was start walking about a mile every day after dinner, and replaced her breakfast with fruits, and within 2 months, the pounds started coming off. She went from a size 16 down to a 10 in less than a year... I wish you the best and let me know if you have any other food tips.

_michael_craft_

Fri Jan 11, 2008 09:32AM

Lee:

You're 100% correct.

One of things I forget is that there's a strong connection between mind and body in a lot of people. If you have a low self-image of yourself, or are depressed, food often becomes a source of pleasure. It's an "escape." In this respect, overeating is more of a mental problem than a physical problem. (FYI, these comments are NOT targeted at Aileen. I am speaking in general terms here.)

It is certainly true that yoga, counseling, meditation, religion, spirituality, etc. can make positive changes in person's self image and/or lift them out of depression. If this results in them feeling better about themselves and losing weight, then I'm 100% in favor of it.

FYI, the "mind over body" stuff is not for me; I’m hopelessly too analytical and logical for it to work on me. But for a lot of people it apparently works. I'm in favor of anything that works.

_michael_craft_

Fri Jan 11, 2008 09:39AM

Kathy:

You and I are in compete agreement. Especially when it comes to fried foods. Coating otherwise healthy food in a thick layer of saturated fat makes absolutely no sense to me. There is no nutritional, logical, or rational reason to do it. I look at fried foods as if they were poison.


eleehenderson

Fri Jan 11, 2008 09:42AM

Be patient with your process Michael. We all get a lifetime in which to figure these things out for ourselves. If we're lucky, and aware, every day presents new lessons.

Having fun,

Lee

pettyhead

Fri Jan 11, 2008 01:51PM

Health issues have definitely come into play here. I have thyroid problems but that doesn't account for all the weight I have gained. With the weight I have gotten high blood pressure and high cholesterol not to mention back pain from the extra weight.
There was a time in my life that I would ride my bike all over the county and ran track and crosss country. Now, the thought of exercise makes me cringe. I have found a few things that I enjoy doing , though. And,I;ve found that , even if I don't feel like doing something , if I force myself to do it I end up enjoying it. I have several workout tapes and I also have a Wii. Say what you want about video games but I can work up a sweat playing tennis!
I will say that it's amazing how different your body feels when you eat something healthy and don't eat until your stuffed. Tonight I'm going to attempt making some sort of cajun seafood dish. I believe I can trick everyone into eat it without them knowing it's good for them.

_michael_craft_

Fri Jan 11, 2008 03:36PM

> I have thyroid problems but that doesn't account for all the weight I have gained.

Agree.

One thing I've noticed is that a lot of overweight people use a disease or condition as an excuse for being overweight. "It’s not my fault I'm fat. I suffer from (insert name of disease)." The truth is that weight gain/loss is strictly a function of how many calories you ingest vs. how many calories you burn. While it is certainly true various conditions can affect your metabolic rate, the bottom line is that *anyone* is capable of losing weight regardless of any disease or condition they might have.

> the thought of exercise makes me cringe.

Yea, I hear ya there! My advice is to first focus on permanently changing your diet. After that, start getting into exercise. A lot of people don't know this, but you can lose all the weight you want by permanently changing your diet - no exercise is required! But of course, exercise *is* important. But not for weight control as many believe... it is almost impossible to permanently lose weight by exercise alone. Instead, you should exercise because it's good for overall heath (better cardiovascular health, better circulation, etc.)

> I will say that it's amazing how different your body feels when you eat something healthy and don't eat until your stuffed.

Amen! And if you stick to the new diet you will find the opposite is true: greasy, fat-laden foods will make you physically ill.

I'm real excited about this, Aileen. Your success or failure will depend 100% on whether or not you stick with it. The vast majority of people don't stick with it - if they do not see any results in a week or two they say, "Diets just don't work for me," and then they quit and go back to their old ways. Don't give up! If you stick with it the weight WILL come off and you WILL start feeling better. I guarantee it. :)

kmetz

Fri Jan 11, 2008 05:55PM

Yoga is a great for you body, soul and mind. If you have the correct mind set anything is possible because we all are in control of our own lives. Of course, I don't believe that we are just mere flesh and bone, but, alas, that is another entire discussion.
I am not a vegetarian, but have tried a lot of vegetarian dishes. A veggie burger does not taste like a hamburger, but it has it's own flavor and that's what can make it great! I have a good recipe ( just my opinion) for homemade veggie burgers if you are interested.
Just be good to yourself and enjoy each and every moment and you will see changes.

Have a Happy Weekend!

Karen

eleehenderson

Sun Jan 13, 2008 12:47PM

I just saw a great issue of People Magazine which has 15 Success Stories of people who have shed lots of pounds, and their advice on how they made their programs work for them. There is not one specific diet, just a combination of a lot of ideas that resulted in people being more healthy and happy. It's the January 14th issue.

Having fun,

Lee

pettyhead

Sun Jan 13, 2008 03:13PM

I have a subscription for People so I have the issue. They do stories like that twice a year. It definitely gives you some inspiration. They also had the couple that was in that issue on a tv show , the other day. Inside Edition or something like that. They lost over 500 pounds combined. That's amazing!
I'm just trying to keep the word diet out of the equation. It's a mental thing , I suppose , but if I look at it as a whole lifestyle change I think I can do this. Maybe I'm just weird. ;-) I think I'm just going to go with the new red meats , no fried foods , no sweets and lots of veggies and fruit. Also finding time for yoga and meditation which will be the hardest thing to do with my life going the way it is ,right now. VERY busy and a grandson running underfoot most of the day and night.
As for the recipes I would love your recipe for veggie burgers and any other recipes anyone has to offer.
I would love to have the money to go back to the YMCA but we've got a huge home improvement project we are facing for the next 4-5 months so that's out. I have a feeling I'll be getting plenty of exercise knocking down drywall and hauling crap out of the upstairs , though , so I should be covered there.
I would like to substitute meats with more beans and rice and such but I'm afraid that starches will add weight even when eliminating meat. Anyone have any clue about that one? Is there any such thing as good starches? Also , does anyone know if there is still a food co-op in town? My friend's mother had belonged to one years ago and got alot of natural foods through them.

joeslater

Sun Jan 13, 2008 07:03PM

Aileen,

Having recently been diagnosed as a Type 2 diabetic and having undergone proceedures to open arteries in both legs and a triple heart by-pass, I took a class of training for diabetics.

Beans, rice, potatoes, corn, etc are in fact, starches. One of the diabolic things about starches in your system is the body turns those starches into sugar. If your lifestyle is primarily sedentary, guess what that sugar does.

Those of us that are diabetic can still eat those things but, only in very small quantities. Pretty much, cup your hand and what will fit in your palm is what you're allowed. And, not every day.

Currently, I'm trying a beneficial chocolate called Xocai that is claimed to provide a major quantity of antioxidants which are supposed to be beneficial. This chocolate is 70% cacao with acai berries and a few other healthful ingredients. If you're interested, I can get you some more info.

pettyhead

Sun Jan 13, 2008 08:46PM

I've never heard of Xocia. I'll have to see if they have that down in Yellow Springs. If it's good for you they have it.
I'm open to any info you have. i wonder what vegetarians eat to fill them up and yet still stay skinny and , more importantly , healthy. You have to eat something besides fruit and veggies. I've read so many things that seem so extreme from websites of people who seem a bit nuts to me. It's getting a bit overwhelming sifting through all the information and misinformation and making an educated guess as to what is best for us.

kmetz

Thu Jan 17, 2008 11:13AM

Here are a couple of recipes that I like. Remember, if you are expecting a hamburger, you will be disappointed, but these have a wonderful flavor of their own.

Black Bean Veggie Burgers

1-16oz. can black beans, drained and rinsed
1/2 green pepper, cut into 2 in. pieces
1/2 onion cut into wedges
3 cloves of garlic
1 hard boiled egg peeled
1 tbs. chili powder
1 tbs. cumin
1tsp thai chili sauce of hot sauce
1/2 cup bread crumbs

Finely chop pepper, onion and garlic in food processor ( just dice into shall pieces), then stir in the mashed beans. In a small bowl, stir together the egg, chili powder, cumin and chili sauce. Stir the egg mixture into the mashed beans. Mix in the bread crumbs until it is sticky and holds together. Make into patties (around 4). If you are grilling them, place on foil. You can bake them at 375 for about 10 minutes on each side. Enjoy!

Rice Burgers

2 cups cooked rice (great way to use left over rice)
1/2 cup bread crumbs
1 cup mixed veggies finely chopped (celery, carrots, squash, broccoli, etc...............get creative)
salt and pepper
1/3 cup oil

Mix rice, bread crumbs, veggies and seasonings together. Make into burgers (around 6). Fry for 8-10 minutes on each side in lightly oiled frying pan over medium heat. The recipe also suggests you can try cooked barley instead of rice, but I have never tried it that way.

I like these recipes because they use some of my favorite foods, black beans, rice and veggies. I hope you enjoy them if you choose to try them. They are also very simple................one of my other favorite things. : ) Karen

pettyhead

Thu Jan 17, 2008 01:16PM

Thanks for the recipes. The veggie burger recipe sounds alot more flavorful than the frozen ones in the store. I am heading out to the store soon and will be picking up the items I need to try it out.
Also , I bought a few Uncle Bean rice mixes such as southwestern. I bet the leftover rice from that would give the rice burgers some good zip.

_michael_craft_

Thu Jan 17, 2008 03:44PM

*On Jan 13, 2008, at 8:46 PM, Aileen Horch said:*
> I've read so many things that seem so extreme from websites of people who seem a bit nuts to me. It's getting a bit overwhelming sifting through all the information and misinformation and making an educated guess as to what is best for us.

Yep.

Unfortunately a lot of people begin their weight loss journey by reading (and believing) a lot of things that simply aren't true.

Here's the deal:

- Some of the things you do will have a *first*-order effect on losing weight.
- Some of the things you do will have a *second*-order effect on losing weight.
- Some of the things you do will have a *third*-order effect on losing weight.

There is only *one* first-order effect: *consuming* *less* *calories*. That's it. There are numerous second-order effects. These include exercise, eating better, and eating less fat. And then there are the third-order effects. These include blood type, vitamins, types of carbs, types of sugars, balanced diet, food combinations, food additives, times of day for eating, etc.

The problem is that a lot of articles focus on third-order effects and ignore the first- and second-order effects. If you do what these articles say - and only focus on third-order effects - you will *never* lose weight.

To successfully lose weight, most of your focus must be on the first-order effect since it is (by definition) the most important. You should also make a good effort to focus on the second-order effects, all the while keeping in mind that none are as important as the first-order effect. You should not even think about the third-order effects unless the first- and second-order effects are 100% addressed.

pettyhead

Thu Jan 17, 2008 03:49PM

At the risk of cursing myself , i've lost 10 pounds , so far. I'm still not sure I'm eating all the right things in the right quantity. I've got alot of veggies in my diet but I'm concerned maybe too many beans and rice.

_michael_craft_

Thu Jan 17, 2008 03:56PM

*On Jan 17, 2008, at 3:49 PM, Aileen Horch said:*
> At the risk of cursing myself , i've lost 10 pounds , so far. I'm still not sure I'm eating all the right things in the right quantity. I've got alot of veggies in my diet but I'm concerned maybe too many beans and rice.

You go girl!!!! :)

Not to burst your bubble, but rapid weight loss in the beginning is not uncommon. Unfortunately, though, it's often because of water loss and not fat loss. I'm not saying this is the case in your situation; I'm simply saying that this is the case for most people who go on a diet. To make sure this is not happening, make sure you drink lots of water throughout the day.

A lot of people will say you shouldn't eat rice or bread when on a diet, and that there are "better" things to eat. While they are technically correct, it should be kept in mind that it is a third-order effect. (See my previous post.) So I wouldn't worry about it too much at this stage. Just focus on eating less calories for now.

whepp

Thu Jan 17, 2008 04:38PM

Awesome, Aileen! You mut have been doing the right things.

pettyhead

Thu Jan 17, 2008 05:20PM

Thanks for the support and the input , everyone. I really do appreciate it. I'll let you know how the recipes go , tomorrow.